CESL Alumni interview - Liu Kanghui: “We are the witnesses of the reform of China’s political system”-China-EU School of Law
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CESL Alumni interview - Liu Kanghui: “We are the witnesses of the reform of China’s political system”

Liu Kanghui graduated from the China-EU School of Law at the China University of Political Science and Law in 2014 with a double master’s degree. After graduating, he worked at the Anti-Corruption Bureau of the Haidian Procuratorate in Beijing. In March 2017, after the reform of the national supervision system, he was transferred to the Haidian District Commission for Discipline Inspection and Supervision. Since the end of 2017 he has worked at the Beijing Municipal Commission for Discipline Inspection and Supervision. In this article, he will share his learning experience and current working experience with us.

1. Could you please talk about your previous experience at the China-EU School of Law?

I developed my ability to think independently during my time at the China-EU School of Law. It is well known that students graduate with a wealth of knowledge from our school. Even if new problems are encountered in the work, the skills that we developed in our school can help us solve these problems quickly.

It is important for students to set their goals as soon as possible, which is more important than taking plenty of classes. In addition, it is recommended that students should actively communicate with their mentors to help them with school work and their future career plan. As for my spare time in school, I read many books that might be of help to me for my graduation dissertation and also took reading notes. These reading notes later basically became the framework of my graduation dissertation.

2. Would you like to share your working experience with us?

After I graduated since 2014, I worked in the Anti-Corruption Bureau of the Haidian District Procuratorate. After three years of anti-corruption work, I was transferred to the Haidian District Commission for Discipline Inspection and Supervision within the context of the reform of the national supervision system. Later I was transferred to the Beijing Municipal Commission for Discipline Inspection Commission.

The work of discipline inspection and supervision is the most challenging. It can be said that we are the witnesses and promoters of the reform of the China political system during this new era. I have participated in the corruption cases of some state-owned enterprises and universities. At times I only sleep eight hours every five days. This work is quite challenging but it brings with is a sense of achievement. In addition, we also have to learn some political theories. I suggest that students pay more attention to political news and know more about our country.

3. Could you please explain the differences among the Discipline Inspection Commission, the Procuratorate and the Supervision Committee?

The Supervision Committee is a political institution. The Commission for Discipline Inspection and the Supervision Commission are two brands of the one set. They are responsible for investigating and punishing all public officials for violations of law and discipline. The Commission for Discipline Inspection is the leading organ of the Communist Party of China and the Supervision Commission is the national supervisory authority. The Procuratorate is mainly involved with prosecution charges, approval for arrest of criminal offences and supervision of civil cases. In fact, the work of the Procuratorate is quite similar to those of the court because they are all judicial authorities.

4. At present, the Procuratorate recruitment also requires students to be involved in the fields of civil and commercial law and economic law. What kind of job will these students be responsible for in the Procuratorate?

One of the functions of the Procuratorate is to accept appeals and re-try applications of civil cases. This aspect of the work may require professional knowledge of civil and commercial law and economic law. Actually, if you work in a court or procuratorate in Beijing, there is no connection requirement regarding your major and the department that you might belong to. When I was at the Haidian District Procuratorate, there were very few students majoring in the criminal law or criminal procedural law.

5. Could you please talk about the current life and working situation of civil servants?

In Beijing, civil servants are really under great pressure. However, there is no problem with the knowledge reserve of students graduated from the China-EU School of Law. The main pressure stems from communication difficulties between colleagues at work. The first two years of work are hard and newcomers always need to pay more. As time goes by, you will gradually become better. Now that the pressure on the civil servants is as strenuous as before, the reforms of the state institutions have been optimised, and the salary levels of the Beijing civil service system have been greatly improved.

Written and Translated by Huang Weijing(2017 double master student)

Photo from Liu Kanghui (2014 CESL graduate)